History


1886--Seedling Mile School was first organized as District #1, Stolley Park School. The school was a one-room structure. It was the first brick school in Hall County.

1888--On February 25, according to an article in the Grand Island Independent, the School District #1 very nearly surrounded the city of Grand Island and was divided into two districts, due to some unpleasantness between the eastern and western portions. The eastern part was set off as School District #74. The patrons elected D.S. Roush as moderator, Hy. Reese as director, and Marvin Stelk as treasurer. Mr. Fred Knaack was the first teacher. He was paid $50.00 per month. There were 37 students enrolled.

1889--There were 38 students enrolled. The teacher, John Stryker, was paid $580.00 for the year.

1912--A second teacher was employed. During this year, another room was added to accommodate an increasing enrollment.

1915--The Lincoln Highway Association preached to the public, "Great oaks from little acorns will grow; long roads of concrete from 'seedling miles' will spring". So began one of the most successful activities of the Lincoln Highway Association. With cement donated by the Portland Cement Co. and funds raised by local sponsors, one-mile concrete sections were constructed in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Nebraska. On November 3, 1915, Grand Island became the first Nebraska city to complete a 'seedling mile'. It was opened to the public on November 16, 1915. It is believed that a small portion of the original pavement still exists. This was the start of the paving which ran east down today's Seedling Mile Road to Seedling Mile School. District #74 became Seedling Mile School.

1925--Grades nine and ten were added, requiring two more teachers to be hired. A few years later another teacher was employed and more rooms were added.

1944--Ninth and tenth grades were discontinued due to higher salaries and a shortage of teachers. Seedling Mile became a kindergarten through eighth-grade school.

1955--Two more classrooms were added, connecting one of the old rooms to an office and library area. A bond issue was passed for $5400.00 to finance this addition.

1960--Funds were made available for adding two more classrooms and storage.

1968--A large portion of the Seedling Mile School District was annexed to the city of Grand Island. Due to a provision in the Nebraska School Laws, the annexed part could not become a part of the Grand Island School District for one full year after the ordinance became effective. Due to court actions, other reasons, and by agreement between the two districts, District #74 (Seedling Mile) continued to operate until the close of the 1972-73 school year.

1973-74--Seedling Mile became a part of the Grand Island Public School System. In 1975, two temporary classrooms were moved in from another site. They were used for P.E. and other Special Services.

1981--James Cannon and Associates were authorized to develop plans for a new school. The project was delayed for 10 years and approval for a new building was finally given in May, 1990.

1986--The centennial of District #1/Seedling Mile Elementary was celebrated during the 1986-87 school year with various activities. A history box was made, and mini courses, reminiscent of days gone by, were taught to the students. Also, an original musical was created and performed.

1991--A beautiful new building was erected utilizing part of the old structure. A brick wall that had been part of the original building was torn down, reconstructed and now is part of a display housing books and mementos donated by former students. Items were gathered from each grade level to be buried in a "time capsule." Items such as student artwork depicting the school's history, a video about the school, pencils, and various other items that represented that era.

1997-98-- Sixth grade was incorportated into middle school, creating a K-5 building.

2002-2003-- K+ was added to the building to support an extra boost for learners. Approximately 10-12 students stay all day to immerse students in language experiences